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Resources Section – Grammar explained

Zu Fuß

On foot’ is more commonly used. It’s what I use, too.

But don’t worry. You won’t be misunderstood. And that’s what’s most important.

We use ‘by‘ when we talk about other means of transport — by bicycle, by tram, by train, by plane, by car, by rickshaw …

Alle=every

Alle=every

The trains to Ulm go every 20 minutes. The train to Timbuktu goes every three days. Every entspricht “alle” in Häufigkeitsangaben.

What about …?

What about …?

We really don't say, "What's about ...?".We ask, "What about ...?" What about us meeting tomorrow at 5 pm?What about that new job of yours.

They’re, their and there

They’re, their and there

They're is short for they are. They are going to the cinema tonight. / They're going to the cinema tonight.Their shows possession. It means it belongs to them. They wanted to give me their books.There refers to a place. I'm going to sit over there now.

Fewer versus less

Fewer versus less

We usually use less for singular nouns/things you can't count (like work, money, time). They gave us less time to get organised. We use fewer for plural nouns/things you can count. We all want to make fewer mistakes.

Bad, worse, the worst

Bad, worse, the worst

Bad translates as schlimm / schlecht. Worse translates as schlimmer / schlechter. The worst, translates as der/die/das/ schlimmste / schlechteste oder am schlimmsten / am schlechtesten.

See you later

See you later

We don't say, "We see us next week" or "We see us later". We say, "See you later" or "See you next week". Or even, "We'll see each other next week".

These or those?

These or those?

Do you remember those / these wonderful nights in Paris? Generally speaking, we use this/these to refer to people and things, situations and experiences that are close to the speaker or very close in time. We use that/those to refer to people and...